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Historic Edgewater Glen Is Showcased On The 2019 Home Tour

Becoming a yearly tradition for many Chicagoans, the Edgewater Home Tour returns next weekend and will feature eight special homes in the Edgewater Glen neighborhood.

The event will take place on Sunday, September 15 rain or shine. The homes, which will be open from 12 p.m. – 5 p.m., will be located on Norwood, Glenlake and Hood. The home tour gives a unique opportunity to a growing number of people interested in exploring historic Edgewater properties and a rare glimpse into the past.

The 2019 tour focuses on the Edgewater Glen community which runs from Broadway to Clark between Norwood to the south and Granville to the north. The neighborhood encompasses 16 blocks of homes that have been meticulously maintained throughout the years.

The first settler in Edgewater Glen was an immigrant from Luxembourg named Nicholas Krantz who built his homestead near Clark and Ridge in 1848. He operated a inn out of his home which included a tavern. In the late 19th century German, Scandinavian and Irish farmers flocked to the neighborhood and began to work the land. In fact, at one point the area was considered the ”celery growing capital of the Midwest.”

In the early 20th century Edgewater Glen and surrounding communities started to attract wealthier families due to its quaint surroundings and proximity to the lake. According to the the Edgewater Historical Society, the organizers of the Edgewater Home Tour, the area homes were largely developed from 1905-1912.

It was then that Edgewater Glen started to sprout American foursquare houses, many of which are featured on the tour. This boxy style of house was popular from the mid-1890s to the late 1930s as a reaction to the ornate architecture found in Victorian and other Revival styles that were used in last half of the 19th century.

Incorporating both the prairie school and the craftsman styles, the American foursquare was part of the transitional period and featured plain and well-made woodwork. The houses were usually two-and-one-half stories high with four large, rooms to a floor providing a maximum amount of interior room space. Other elements include a center dormer, large front porch and arched entries between common rooms.

The Edgewater Home Tour does not require reservations. Registration will take place at St. Gertrude Church (6200 N. Glenwood) between 12 p.m. and 4 p.m. The program costs $25 per person and each participant will receive a souvenir tour booklet containing a map of the neighborhood and descriptions of each home on the tour.

Once you arrive at the selected home, a docent will give you a brief summary of the property’s exterior and key architectural features. Afterwards, participants will be directed inside the home where another docent will escort small groups while pointing out interior features and highlights.

Because it is a walking tour, comfortable shoes are recommended. For more information on the event Click Here.

 


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